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Outlook is a monolith in the Windows-world and although Microsoft is heavily trying to catch up with the Windows-app when it comes to the Mac-derivate, there is still a lot of work to do.

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The new Outlook Experience on the Mac — Picture Credits: Microsoft

A next step of closing the lines has now been made while other, ground-solid features, have been removed — but let’s talk about that later. First of all, Microsoft is further pushing the on-premises-app for macOS to match the new lookalike of the forthcoming macOS 11 „Big Sur“ as Forbes quoted. Second, it may be a coincidence, but it fits quite well that the new version if being distributed to the customers while the support for older versions has been put to the grave.

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Anyway, Microsoft Outlook for Mac-users might already have stepped over the pop-up message showing the „Introduction to the new Outlook“. If you haven’t: Don’t worry, it may be just a matter of time — I reproduced the effect by downloading the latest Outlook-version from the App Store. After connecting my Microsoft 365-Family account and my Outlook-com-E-Mail-account likewise, I didn’t see anything specific. After closing the app and opening it again, the dialogue appeared and I was — literally spoken — able to make the „switch“ to the new user experience. This — of course — may be reverted at any time by swiping the switch to the left at the upper right corner of the app-window, putting everything back into the old optics after a mandatory restart. …


Just hours after the initial release of iOS 14.1, an old companion seems to have dropped the mic: Apparently, Apple has pulled its first-party iOS-app „Remote“ from the App Store.

Friends and users of Apple TV’s may — or may not — have used this app for quite some time. In my use case, it was always a good companion when I didn’t have the will to fiddle with the — sometimes — unwilling physical Apple Remote. As for now, it seems that Apple has put the app to its grave to rely on the control-function provided in iOS’ Control Center.

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Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Although Apple has integrated this feature into iOS two years ago with iOS 12 already, the app was still available in the App Store but ceased to exist at the time of writing. Last year’s update fetched some new clothes in form of a new icon, but additional updates were rather rare anyway. In addition, all further references to the app seem to have disappeared from Apple’s website with support pages now directly linking to the official documents telling how to enable the remote control functionality in Control Center. …


Although Microsoft does many things right, there are always a few aspects ruining the good overall impression.

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Photo by Bram Van Oost on Unsplash

It’s quite difficult to grasp if it is some kind of strange behavior or a special kind of marketing, but as Windows 10 continues to be a modern operating system which gets a big update semi-anually, the question rises wether the user in front of the device is still in the driver-seat or not. Forced reboots for updates, a nasty DNS-bug in Build 2004 preventing internet access or the latest effect of web apps being forcibly installed on a system raise concerns if Windows-users are just a bunch of beta-testers for new features.

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News Apps in Microsoft Edge — Photo Credits: Bleeping Computer

To be specific, voices raised that, at the moment, Microsoft is seemingly performing a test where the company is installing a suite of Office progressive web apps (PWA) in Windows 10 without asking permission from the user. A progressive web app is a kind of app which is designed via a web-based delivery so there is no need for a classical installation in form of executables. When executed, the well-known „wrapper“-style (remember Microsoft Teams being deployed via the Electron Framework?) is presented so that the native web app feels like a Desktop-version although rendered with the browser-engine of, in this case, the new Chromium-based edge. …

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